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Showing results 1-10 of 104 for 'brain'


  • Yizhar_mousebrain_SciTip
    Turning Down the Brain to Erase Fearful Memories

    Dr. Ofer Yizhar, optogenetics pioneer, has used the tools of that field to successfully shut down a neuronal mechanism that helps form fearful memories in the mouse brain. After the procedure, the mice “forgot” that they had been previously frightened. This research, conducted with Prof. Rony Paz, may someday help extinguish traumatic memories in people.

    /media/2017/03/15/turning-down-the-brain-to-erase-fearful-memories
  • Rosenzweig, Rina_3
    Unfolding the Mysteries of Proteins

    WeizmannViews Issue No. 46 is about the research of new young scientist Dr. Rina Rosenzweig. She is expert in using super-powerful NMR machines, applying these skills to her studies of misfolded proteins and the clumps they form. These protein “aggregates” are involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s.

    /media/2017/02/06/unfolding-the-mysteries-of-proteins
  • brain_lightbulb_salon
    Siri Has Nothing on Us: How Do Brain Cells Tell Us Where We’re Going?

    The lab of Prof. Nachum Ulanovsky revealed that brain cells can guide us to our destination, even when we can’t see it. Scientific American’s Moheb Costandi reports on the research in Salon, also addressing related findings from other institutions and the question of whether the Ulanovsky cells are new types of cells, or represent more flexibility in other cells than previously suspected.

    /media/2017/01/15/siri-has-nothing-on-us-how-do-brain-cells-tell-us-where-we-re-going
  • Ulanovsky_bat1_Steve_Gettle_H
    Bats Remember Directions

    Bats - and humans - can find their favorite fruit stand (or coffee shop) even when it’s hidden behind a screen or buildings. How? Prof. Nachum Ulanovsky and team have now identified the neurons that point bats in the right direction, even when their destination is obscured. This could shed light on Alzheimer’s and other disorders.

    /media/2017/01/12/bats-remember-directions
  • The Scientist_neuroimmunity
    Immune System Maintains Brain Health

    Prof. Michal Schwartz's groundbreaking research on neuroimmunology changed the way scientists and clinicians view the interaction between the immune system and the brain. The Scientist provides in-depth reporting on what neuroimmunology is, how it works, and why it is so important.

    /media/2016/11/01/immune-system-maintains-brain-health
  • Stress-Coping Mechanism Helps Mice Make New Friends

    What makes us reluctant or willing to leave our social comfort zones? Prof. Alon Chen and his team in the Department of Neurobiology found that a molecule that helps the brain cope with stress appeared to act as a “social switch” in mice, causing them to either increase interactions with “friends” or seek to meet “strangers.” Since a similar system exists in the human brain, the findings may help explain why some people are better at making new friends, and shed light on the social difficulties experienced by those with autism, schizophrenia, and more.

    /media/2016/07/19/stress-coping-mechanism-helps-mice-make-new-friends
  • Disrupted Immunity in the Fetal Brain Linked to Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    New research from the Institute demonstrates that, in mice, disrupted immunity in the fetal brain is linked to neurodevelopmental disorders. The multi-department study revealed that when a pregnant female is attacked by external factors such as viruses, the brain of the fetus does not develop as it should, resulting in autistic and schizophrenic behavior.

    /media/2016/06/27/disrupted-immunity-in-the-fetal-brain-linked-to-neurodevelopmental-disorders
  • I Was Afraid of Dying – But I Had to Save Them

    As Good Housekeeping reports, “despite her terror of the ocean, mother-of-two Tamara Loiselle found the courage to dive in and save a drowning couple.” What makes a hero? How are some people able to overcome fear? GH uses Weizmann neuroscience research from the lab of Prof. Yadin Dudai to explain.

    /media/2016/06/23/i-was-afraid-of-dying-but-i-had-to-save-them
  • Receptive to Stress

    Prof. Alon Chen’s lab discovered that a receptor, CRFR1, plays a surprising role in the body’s stress response. In mice without CRFR1, females had trouble regulating temperature and blood sugar, while males were barely affected. The results could help develop treatments for regulating hunger or stress responses, including anxiety and depression.

    /media/2016/05/26/stressing-material-exchange