Our Achievements

Moving humanity forward.

The Weizmann Institute of Science has an institutional philosophy of creative collaboration and intellectual curiosity, free from commercial restraints.

Our scientists work with the brightest minds from across the globe—from scientific institutes and medical centers to government agencies and academic institutions—as they search for answers to the biggest questions facing humankind. So far they have developed new ways of fighting disease and hunger, protecting the environment, and harnessing alternative energy solutions.

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    Imagine science that actively engages more than 300,000 kids every year.

    The Davidson Institute of Science Education at the Weizmann Institute cultivates interest in science through extracurricular programs for schoolchildren of all levels of ability.

    Explore Enriching Education
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    Imagine a breakthrough that revolutionizes cancer research and therapy around the globe.

    Scientists at the Weizmann Institute work to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in metastasis, which is still one of the least understood aspects of cancer, and devise strategies against it.

    Explore Fighting Cancer
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    Imagine science that doubles the chances of women with fertility problems to conceive.

    The Weizmann Institute's Prof. Nava Dekel discovered that performing a uterine biopsy just before a woman undergoes in vitro fertilization (IVF) doubles the chances of a successful pregnancy. Her method is now being used by women all over the world.

    Explore Improving Health and Medicine
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    Imagine science that uses algae to fuel cars.

    Weizmann Institute Profs. Avihai Danon and Uri Pick are genetically engineering algae to produce environmentally friendly, sustainable biofuel.

    Explore Protecting Our Planet
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    Imagine science that mathematically predicts material stress and failure in airplanes and dams.

    Weizmann scientists have created a formula to predict how cracks will advance in specific materials. Such a formula has been sought for years to help scientists and engineers predict how materials such as the metal in airplane wings or the concrete in dams will hold up under stress.

    Explore Advancing Technology
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    Imagine science that discovers a new kind of supernova and helps explain the universe.

    Weizmann astrophysicists and an international team discovered a new type of supernova. Levels of calcium and titanium in the explosion indicate that the supernova was a nuclear reaction. This event could help explain mysteries such as the prevalence of calcium in the universe and in our bodies.

    Explore Exploring The Physical World
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    Imagine science that can shed light on the lost worlds of the past.

    Weizmann’s Prof. Steve Weiner and colleagues found fossilized DNA that may be better preserved and less prone to contamination with modern DNA. They showed that DNA fragments preserved in crystal aggregates within fossilized bone can be isolated and studied, giving us improved insight into our past.

    Explore Exploring The Physical World
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    Imagine a microscopic biological computer able to find, identify, and diagnose illnesses in the human body.

    In 2001, Weizmann’s Prof. Ehud Shapiro created the world’s smallest computer. Built from DNA, about a trillion can fit in a drop of water. In 2004, it successfully identified signs of cancer and even released an appropriate drug.

    Explore Advancing Technology
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    Imagine science that can alleviate world hunger with more resilient and bountiful wheat.

    Weizmann scientists developed new protein-enriched wheat varieties that provide nearly 40 percent higher yield, allowing for greater production. These varieties also produce better crops that are more resistant to diseases and natural damage.

    Explore Protecting Our Planet
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    Imagine science that unlocks the mysteries of memory.

    Prof. Yadin Dudai's groundbreaking neuroscience research includes identifying a way to erase memories; the discovery that a brain enzyme can improve memories, even older ones; and the finding that social pressure can lead to falsified memories.

    Explore Improving Health and Medicine
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    Imagine science that uses antibodies to help standard therapies fight cancer.

    Weizmann scientists invented the synergistic effect behind Erbitux®, an antibody-based therapy that presents synergism with conventional chemotherapy. Used to treat colorectal and head and neck cancer, Erbitux® was approved by the FDA in 2001.

    Explore Fighting Cancer
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    Imagine science in the world’s only entirely outdoor science museum.

    The Weizmann Institute’s award-winning, family-friendly Clore Garden of Science, which welcomes around 100,000 guests annually, has hands-on exhibits that make science accessible to everyone.

    Explore Enriching Education